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All the Colours of the Town by Liam McIlvanney Diamonds Are Forever by Ian Fleming A Conspiracy of Tall Men by Noah Hawley Dandy Gilver & A DEADLY MEASURE of BRIMSTONE by Catriona McPherson CUT OUT by Fergus McNeill Night Music by John Connolly Harbour Nocturne by Joseph Wambaugh An American Spy by Olen Steinhausen First Response by Stephen Leather Cold Hearts by Gunnar Staalesen A Killing in the Hills by Julia Keller ICARUS by Deon Meyer Black Water Rising by Attica Locke The October List by Jeffery Deaver The Thief by Fuminori Nakamura Garden of Beasts by Jeffery Deaver Thunderball by Ian Fleming Fun & Games by Duane Swierczynski Instruments of Darkness by Imogen Robertson Deadly Web by Barbara Nadel
 
All the Colours of the Town by Liam McIlvanney
 


Reviews
"McIlvanney has flair and assurance and executes a powerful tale with all the dextrous sensitivity and ballsy swagger the subject is due."

"All the colours of the town is dark fiction, plumbing the abysmal depths of human behaviour in a scorching crime-mystery tale."
All the Colours of the Town
Liam McIlvanney

Suddenly the Glasgow newspaper business had become aggressive; Rix has been brought in to the Tribune as Editor to do what is needed to save the circulation. Gerry Conway, time served and well connected reporter, is handed a photo that puts Peter Lyons, Minister of Justice, among dubious company in Belfast. Despite misgivings, this is a story to follow up. His leads point him to the New Covenanters, a Scottish group who provided support for Ulster’s Protestant organisations.

As he dredges through a violent past, Isaac Hepburn, one time UVF Commander who served seventeen years in Long Kesh, offers help at a price. But Gerry Conway discovers that neither stories or information is in short supply and a violent past can still lead to a violent present. There are scores to settle and a reporter’s instinct is sometimes not enough.


No need for a photo-shoot for this story    more...

Your reporter in Belfast    more...

Beaten-up but not yet beaten.    more...


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